Gaylord Nelson, founder of Earth Day protects the Namekagon River

Gaylord Nelson waves to supporters as he paddles the Namekagon to protect it from a 345,000 volt transmission line

Gaylord Nelson joins supporters in paddling the beautiful Namekagon River in commemoration of his paddle in 1965 when he acted to preserve the Namekagon as a Wild and Scenic River
 

To read Gaylord's May 2004 statement to the National Parks Service opposing the crossing of the Namekagon River by the 345,000 volt transmission line, click here to read the pdf file
 

Paddling his canoe was the son of Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe elder Bill Barber, Buck Barber and his seven year old grandson Star Man Barber. Bill Barber had served as Senator Nelson's guide in the historic 1965 paddle organized by Hayward business man Tony Wise. 138 canoes joined them in 1965 filled with members of the Lac Courte Oreilles Tribe and many others who love the river.

The day was a high point in Gaylord Nelson's long and honorable life.

 

Stinnett Rpaids on the NamekagonChippewa women bless the fleetChippewa women from Mole Lake hold the sacred water staff above the river as they paddle across to bless the riverThe Eagle Feather staff with Gaylord Nelson eagle feather crosses the Namekagon to bless the river and the dayThe Eagle Feather Water staff arrives safely upon the far shore

Glenn Stoddard helps launch Gaylord Nelson's canoeGaylord Nelson shares a smile with his Lac Courte Oreilles Chippewa guidesGaylord Nelson enjoying the Namekagon RiverGaylord Nelson waves to supporters on shoreGaylord Nelson at Stinnett landing on Namekagon River

 

Gaylord Nelson's canoe paddles the Namekagon. Later DNR Secretary George Meyer's kayak tipped over and Meyer enjoyed the clean Namekagon River waters from the underside.Gaylord Nelson and his Chippewa guide Buck Barber paddle the wild NamekagonGaylord Nelson canoes the wild and scenic Namekagon River to protect itTony Wise's daughter Janie Wise with husband Randy Sabien join Nelson on the NamekagonNeighbors Mary Ann and Gene Laajala join Nelson on the River to help stop ATC Namekagon River crossing

 

View photo history of events that lead to protecting the river

 

View the full honor ceremony

 

View photos of the Namekagon River

 

  To learn more about why these Indian and non-Indian people came together to protect a river and their future generations, click here. 

 To read Gaylord's May 2004 statement to the National Parks Service opposing the crossing of the Namekagon River by the 345,000 volt transmission line, click here to read the pdf file